“Here the dreamless dead would lie, leached to bone by the passing seasons, and waiting, as all the dead would wait, for doomsday’s horn.”
—Rick Atkinson, The Day of Battle

• • •

“Depraved by good fortune and not chastened by adversity, what you desire in the restoration of a peaceful and secure state, is not the tranquility of the commonwealth, but the impunity of your own vicious luxury.”
—St. Augustine, The City of God

“And yet they do not impute to their gods the luxury and avarice, the cruel and dissolute manners, that had rendered the republic utterly wicked and corrupt, even before the coming of Christ; but whatever affliction their pride and effeminacy have exposed them to in these latter days, they furiously impute to our religion.”
—St. Augustine, The City of God

“Now, against the sacrilegious and impious darings of reason, we assert both that God knows all things before they come to pass, and that we do by our own free will whatsoever we know and feel to be done by us only because we will it.”
—St. Augustine, The City of God

“But, as the Creator Himself is hidden and incomprehensible to man, so also is the manner of creation. Although, therefore, the standing miracle of this visible world is little thought of, because always before us, yet, when we arouse ourselves to contemplate it, it is a greater miracle than the rarest and most unheard of marvels.”
—St. Augustine, The City of God

“For, though the voices of prophets were silent, the world itself, by its well-ordered changes and movements, and by the fair appearance of all visible things, bears a testimony that of its own, both that it has been created, and also that it could not have been created save by God, whose greatness and beauty are unutterable and invisible.”
—St. Augustine, The City of God

“Not even lions or dragons have ever waged with their kind such wars as men have waged with one another.”
—St. Augustine, The City of God

• • •

“Every educational system has a moral goal that it tries to attain and that forms its curriculum.”
—Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind

“Country, religion, family, ideas of civilization, all the sentimental and historical forces that stood between cosmic infinity and the individual, providing some notion of a place within the whole, have been rationalized and have lost their compelling force.”
—Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind

• • •

“Reason itself is a matter of faith. It is an act of faith to assert that our thoughts have any relation to reality at all.”
—G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

“The moment you step into the world of facts, you step into a world of limits.”
—G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

“Think the moon is a blue moon, a single elephantine sapphire. But don’t fancy that all that frantic astronomy would make the smallest difference to reason and justice of conduct. On plains of opal, under cliffs cut out of pearl, you would still find a notice-board: ‘Thou shalt not steal …’.”
—G.K. Chesterton, The Blue Cross

“You attacked reason,” said Father Brown. “It’s bad theology.”
—G.K. Chesterton, The Blue Cross

• • •

“Come, come,” said Venables. “I really can’t go along with this modern playing down of evil as something that doesn’t really exist. There is evil. And evil is powerful. Sometimes more powerful than good. It’s there. It has to be recognized—and fought. Otherwise—“ he spread out his hands. “We go down to darkness.”
—Agatha Christie, The Pale Horse

• • •

“The very fact that science speaks so authoritatively in our culture tempts ideologues and worldview promoters to claim the authority of science as validating claims that in fact are not testable by experiment, and that may go far beyond the available evidence.”
—Phillip E. Johnson, The Wedge of Truth

“The citizens who protest the policy of the science educators perceive correctly that the educators want to teach their children that naturalism is a fundamental truth for all purposes, not just a convention employed for limited purposes by professional scientists.”
—Phillip E. Johnson, The Wedge of Truth

• • •

“Thus it is, when the moral restraints of religion and tradition, hierarchy and precedent, are removed, the power to suspend or unleash catastrophic events does not devolve on the impersonal benevolence of the masses but falls into the hands of men who are isolated by the very totality of their evil natures.”
—Paul Johnson, Modern Times

• • •

“For the writers of the Bible history is not a meaningless series of recurring cycles but a vehicle whereby God realizes his purposes with man and the cosmos. The idea that history is moving toward divinely established goals, and that the future is to be seen as the fulfillment of promises made in the past, is the unique contribution of the prophets of Israel.”
—Anthony A. Hoekema, The Bible and the Future

“The kingdom is established by God’s sovereign grace, and its blessings are to be received as gifts of that grace. Man’s duty is not to bring the kingdom into existence, but to enter into it by faith, and to pray that he may be enabled more and more to submit himself to the beneficent rule of God in every area of his life.”
—Anthony A. Hoekema, The Bible and the Future

• • •

“We have succumbed to a myth that claims that morality comes naturally, or at most, with the help of a little reasoning. But it seems increasingly clear that these metaphors and the models that flow from them aren’t working. The ‘natural’ thing to do in most situations is to take the easy way out. The most perfectly rational plan of action is to always put yourself first.”
—William Kirkpatrick, Why Johnny Can’t Tell Right from Wrong

“Teaching right from wrong has as much bearing on a culture’s survival as teaching reading, writing, or science.”
—William Kirkpatrick, Why Johnny Can’t Tell Right from Wrong

• • •

“The distinction between natural and supernatural, in fact, broke down; and when it had done so, one realized how great a comfort it had been—how it had eased the burden of intolerable strangeness which this universe imposes on us by dividing it into two halves and encouraging the mind never to think of both in the some context. What price we may have paid for this comfort in the way of false security and accepted confusion of thought is another matter.”
—C.S. Lewis, Perelandria

“Either he [Jesus] was a raving lunatic of an unusually abominable type, or else He was, and is, precisely what he said. There is no middle way.”
—C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain

“Try to exclude the possibility of suffering which the order of nature and the existence of free wills involve, and you find that you have excluded life itself.”
—C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain

“A man can no more diminish God’s glory by refusing to worship him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word ‘darkness’ on the walls of his cell.”
—C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain

“That same mysterious force which we call gravitational when it steers the planets and biochemical when it heals a live body, is the efficient cause of all recoveries. And that energy proceeds from God in the first instance. All who are cured by Him, not merely in the sense that His providence provides them with medical assistance and wholesome environments, but also in the sense that their very tissues are repaired by the far-descended energy which, flowing from Him, energizes the whole system of Nature.”
—C.S. Lewis, Miracles

“What should they find incredible, since they believed no longer in a rational universe? What should they regard as too obscene, since they held that all morality was a mere subjective by-product of the physical and economic situations of men?”
—C.S. Lewis, That Hideous Strength

• • •

“I started out as a romantic and ended up as a realist.”
—Ross MacDonald, Black Money

• • •

“There was nothing to be done; a circumstance that happily suited our disinclination to do anything.”
—Herman Melville, Typee

• • •

“The truth is that our civilization is not Christian; it is a tragic compound of great ideal and fearful practice, of high assurance and desperate anxiety, of loving charity and fearful clutching of possessions.”
—Alan Paton, Cry, the Beloved Country

• • •

“A clear and distinct understanding of the law and the gospel enables one to assert both the absolute freeness of sovereign grace and the sacred interests of true holiness.”
—Ernest C. Reisinger, The Law and the Gospel

• • •

“It’s what one does, and nothing else, that shows the stuff one’s made of.”
—Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit

• • •

“I’m diggin’ away, too; between us we ought to get somethin’—you in your small corner and I in mine, as the hymn says—or is it a hymn? I remember readin’ it in a book about missionaries when I was small. Did you want to be a missionary in your youth? I did. I think most kids do some time or another, which is odd, seein’ how unsatisfactory most of us turn out.”
—Dorothy L. Sayers, Clouds of Witness

“The clergyman was a tall, faded man, with lines of worry deeply engraved upon his face, and mild blue eyes a little bewildered by the disappointing difficulty of things in general.”
—Dorothy L. Sayers, Strong Poison

“He felt for the first time the dull and angry helplessness which is the first warning stroke of the triumph of mutability.”
—Dorothy L. Sayers, Strong Poison

“There is a universal moral law, as distinct from a moral code, which consists of certain statements of fact about the nature of man; and by behaving in conformity with which, man enjoys his true freedom. This is what the Christian Church calls ‘the natural law.’ ”
—Dorothy L. Sayers, The Mind of the Maker

• • •

“Christianity was necessary for the beginning of modern science for the simple reason that Christianity created a climate of thought which put men in a position to investigate the form of the universe.”
—Francis A. Schaeffer, Escape from Reason

• • •

“ ‘I think she’s—she’s so beautiful,’ Dee said generously. It was the very best she could manage about Rilly. And, if you could erase the selfish mouth, silence the whine in the voice, disregard the flashes of calculation in the lovely eyes—if, indeed, shape and color and smoothness and texture were the only real criteria of beauty—it was true.”
—Eleanor Shaler, Gaunt’s Daughter

• • •

“No ancient heresy is reproduced in every detail in our modern age, but certain basic types recur with almost monotonous regularity, if only because there are a limited number of basic ways of tampering with received truth.”
—M.A. Smith, From Christ to Constantine

• • •

“I would have given the world to take back what I had said; but a word once spoken, who can recapture it?”
—Robert Louis Stevenson, Kidnapped

• • •

“ ‘ Metaphor,’ he said suddenly, ‘is a treacherous thing. After a while it’s better to forego it and do something objective, like eating breakfast or putting new laces in your shoes.”
—Mary Stolz, Ready or Not

“I don’t think it’s prudish to dislike ugly things.”
—Mary Stolz, Ready or Not

“Half-truths, thought Cassie. That’s what we have to live by. For someone who had started out trying to live, in the naked glare of absolute truth, it seemed the saddest admission she had ever had to make.”
—Mary Stolz, Who Wants Music on Mondays?

• • •

“There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesome returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.”
—Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi

• • •

“She was not very clear what language she was using; as from the apostles on Pentecost, the single gospel flowed from her in accents she had not practiced and syllables she had never learned.”
—Charles Williams, The Greater Trumps

• • •

“To deem all beliefs equally true is sheer nonsense for the simple reason that to deny that statement would also, then, be true.”
—Ravi Zacharias, Jesus among other Gods

“Truth by definition excludes.”
—Ravi Zacharias, Jesus among other Gods

“We assume, at this time in the history of thought, that the ancients were more gullible than we and that we have come of age, when, in truth, some of the credulity we have displayed would have rightly made them squirm.”
—Ravi Zacharias, Jesus among other Gods

“The truth is that we cannot escape the existential rub by running from a moral law. Objective moral values exist only if God exists.”
—Ravi Zacharias, Jesus among other Gods

Authors

Rick Atkinson

St. Augustine

Allan Bloom

G.K. Chesterton

Agatha Christie

Phillip E. Johnson

Paul Johnson

Anthony A. Hoekema

William Kirkpatrick

C.S. Lewis

Ross MacDonald

Herman Melville

Alan Paton

Ernest C. Reisinger

Jean-Paul Sartre

Dorothy L. Sayers

Francis A. Schaeffer

M.A. Smith

Robert Louis Stevenson

Mary Stolz

Mark Twain

Charles Williams

Ravi Zacharias

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