The Science of Blaming Christians for Coronavirus and other Calamities

By Dave Dentel

Sure it’s crass, ill-timed, and verges on bigotry. But Katherine Stewart’s recent op-ed in the New York Times blaming Christians for the devastating severity of the COVID-19 outbreak doesn’t merit returning rancor for rancor.

For one thing, Christians are used to being scapegoated. They’ve been assailed for allegedly inspiring all sorts of calamities, from the collapse of Rome in the fifth century to the gruesome mass shooting at a Florida nightclub in 2016.

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Apologetics Survey Weaves a Story You Can Believe

dore-moses-cropped
Man has been rebelling against God since well before the law was given on Mount Sinai, depicted here by Dore.

Godless despotism reached its apotheosis in the 20th century, killing millions and wreaking destruction on a scale unequaled in human history.

These crimes no doubt did much to taint the flavor of atheism associated with this murderous movement and the particular political forms in which it was manifested: fascism and communism.

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Classic Sci Fi Goes Deep

Note: This was originally posted December 24, 2012.
By Dave Dentel

When a good friend agreed to introduce me to classic science fiction I had long ignored, I didn’t realize how quickly his generosity would deliver a brilliant pay-off.

Heinlein_Universe
Robert A. Heinlein’s 1941 tale delves into the nature of both religious and materialistic inquiry.Also worth reading:
“How Star Wars Ruined Sci Fi”

 

Already I’ve encountered a Heinlein story with surprising insight into one of my favorite nonfiction topics—the intersection of science and faith.

While it’s no fable of intelligent design, Robert A. Heinlein’s 1941 tale “Universe” certainly delves into the nature of both religious and materialistic inquiry. In fact, the adventure aspect of the story serves as a backdrop for exploring how human beings comprehend reality and their purpose in it.

Truly Lost

Indeed, the point of “Universe”—which employs a now-familiar narrative about multiple generations of space colonists inhabiting a massive and drifting ship—is that these travelers are lost not only in physical space but also in how they perceive their cosmos.

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Atheist’s Book Can’t Break Religion’s Spell

A Review by Dave Dentel

Note: This was originally posted in 2006. Dennett’s book was one of the first I read as research for my own work, The God Imperative.

To anyone familiar with his career, it’s no surprise that Darwinist philosopher Daniel C. Dennett has a problem with religion. What is surprising, however, is the ardor with which Dennett delivers what Richard John Neuhaus of First Things characterizes as a “mugging of religion” in his latest book, Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon.

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